POW-BRIDGE MLL2: Solutions to main challenges of posting of workers rules

POW-BRIDGE Mutual Learning Lab 2 (MLL2): Solutions to main challenges in the implementation of posting of workers rules

The Second Mutual Learning Lab (MLL2) of the POW-BRIDGE project took place on 26 May 2021. The aim of MLL2 was to follow up on the results from the first Mutual Learning Lab (MLL1) and to identify and discuss solutions addressing main challenges in the implementation practice of the posting of workers rules in 8 project countries: Austria, Hungary, Italy, Poland, North Macedonia, Serbia, Slovakia, and Slovenia. Read more, more about POW-BRIDGE

01/06/21: Call for project peer reviewers – The Science Fund of the Republic of Serbia (SFRS)

The Science Fund of the Republic of Serbia (SFRS) is looking for international experts to ensure a reviewing process of project proposals submitted for funding programs of the SFRS.

01/06/21: Call for project peer reviewers – The Science Fund of the Republic of Serbia (SFRS)

The Science Fund of the Republic of Serbia (SFRS), a state institution providing grants to researchers in Serbia, is looking for international experts in order to ensure an objective, high-quality two-stage reviewing process of project proposals submitted for funding programs of the SFRS.

More information on the Details of the Call, including inclusion and assessment criteria, ToR and fees are available at the following link

Online article: Youth Underemployment in the Western Balkans: A Multidimensional Approach

Online article: Youth Underemployment in the Western Balkans: A Multidimensional Approach by Petreski et al.

When a worker works at most 35 hours a week and wants to work more, he is said to be underemployed. In addition, when his skills are underutilized, there is uncertainty about the job, he is underpaid and there is lack of formal working conditions, he is said to be multidimensionally underemployed. This paper analyzes youth underemployment multidimensionality and its effect on wages in three Western Balkan countries: North Macedonia, Serbia, and Montenegro. Our empirical approach controls for sample-selection bias and endogeneity through internally-generated instruments. The findings suggest that intensifying underemployment along the multidimensional scale reduces wage on average by 7.6%. The effect is the strongest in North Macedonia, followed by Montenegro and Serbia. Read more

Online Article: The ‘refugee crisis’ and its transformative impact on EU-Western Balkans relations

Online Article: The ‘refugee crisis’ and its transformative impact on EU-Western Balkans relations by Webb 

This article explores to what extent the securitisation of the refugee crisis led to policy changes and the consequence of these changes on EU relations with the countries of North Macedonia and Serbia. Read more

Closed (30/12/20) CfP: Welfare state and social policies in the CEE region

The peer-reviewed, open access scientific journal Problemy Polityki Społecznej/Social Policy Issues invites original paper submissions for a special issue to bring together papers exploring a broad array of research questions related to welfare state and social policies in the CEE region.

Journal of Social Policy Issues: Cfp on Special Issue “Welfare state and social policies in the CEE region: past developments, present challenges and prospects for the future”

Deadline: 30 December 2020

University of Warsaw invites to submit original papers to the special issue of Problemy Polityki Społecznej. Social Policy Issues – a peer-reviewed, OPEN ACCESS journal, published by University of Warsaw.

The planned Special Issue “Welfare state and social policies in the CEE region: past developments, present challenges and prospects for the future” aims to bring together papers exploring a broad array of research questions related to welfare state and social policies in the CEE region, that may touch upon past developments, present challenges as well as future prospects. By CEE region we mean a large group of countries including Albania, Belarus, Bulgaria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Czechia, Estonia, Hungary, Kosovo, Latvia, Lithuania, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Ukraine as well as sub-country regions, e.g. east of Germany.

The best paper submitted to this issue will receive an award of 400 euro. Read more

2020 Updated Reviews: on the European Pillar of Social Rights in the Western Balkans

2020 Updated Reviews: on the European Pillar of Social Rights in the Western Balkans

The European Centre updated the existing reviews on the European Pillar of Social Rights in the Western Balkans: Albania, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Kosovo, Montenegro, Republic of North Macedonia, and Serbia. The European Centre had already been engaged as international expert organization in the original reviews prepared in 2018. On behalf of the Regional Cooperation Council, the European Centre team was working with country experts and provided quality assurance to ensure that the reports were of high quality, consistent, clear, accurate, sourced, appropriate and timely. Read or download the six reports for 2020 here.

Report: Serbia 2020

Report: Serbia 2020 Report by the European Commission

The European Commission has published 2020 Enlargement Packagew which contains detailed assessment of the state of play in each candidate country and potential candidate, what has been achieved over the last year, and set out guidelines on reform priorities. Read here

Survey: South-East European local Governments Inpost Covid19 Socio-Economic Recovery

Survey: South-East European local Governments Inpost Covid19 Socio-Economic Recovery by NALAS

Within the BACID programme NALAS and KDZ implemented a study on Covid19. 150 mayors and local government representatives havev been interviewed for this study and reveal the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cities and municipalities in South-East Europe. Also good practices and recommendations for the socio-economic recovery on local level are provided. Read more

Criminal Law Protection of People with Disabilities against Discrimination in the Republic of Serbia

Persons with disabilities in the Republic of Serbia are a very sensitive category that is discriminated against in multiple ways and excluded from the main social aspects. The mechanisms of protecting persons with disabilities, securing equal representation and their complete integration are achieved through adequate legislation and criminal laws, and also special protection in big crisis such as pandemic COVID-19.

Filip Mirić & Aleksandra Nikolajević, University of Niš, Republic of Serbia

For an open and democratic society, it is of crucial importance that all its citizens, regardless of their personal characteristics and features, have a right to education, cultural activities, recreation, access to the labor market, and equality in all segments of social life. Persons with disabilities in the Republic of Serbia are a very sensitive category that is discriminated against in multiple ways and excluded from the main social aspects. The mechanisms of protecting persons with disabilities, securing equal representation and their complete integration are achieved through adequate legislation and criminal laws, and also special protection in big crisis such as pandemic COVID-19.

In the legal system of Republic of Serbia discrimination is a crime. Firstly, we should mention the criminal offense of violation of equality under Article 128 of the Criminal Code of the Republic of Serbia (hereinafter referred to as CC). Another important offence envisaged in Article 387 of the Serbian Criminal Code is the criminal offense of racial and other discrimination. The basic form of this criminal offense is committed by anyone who, on the grounds of differences in race, color, religion, nationality, ethnic origin or some other personal characteristic, violates the fundamental human rights and freedoms guaranteed by universally accepted rules of international law and international treaties ratified by Serbia; the perpetrator of such a crime may be punished by a term of imprisonment ranging from six months to five years. Apart from this, there are other forms of the same criminal offense. The same punishment (imprisonment ranging from six months to five years) will be imposed on those who persecute organizations or individuals for their efforts to promote equality.

A number of offences are punished by imprisonment ranging from three months to three years, such as in the case of anyone who spreads ideas about the superiority of one race over another, or propagates racial hatred or incites racial discrimination; anyone who disseminates or otherwise makes public texts, pictures or any other representation of ideas or theories that advocate or encourage hatred, discrimination or violence against any person or group of persons based on race, skin color, religious affiliation, nationality, ethnicity origin or other personal property; and anyone who publicly threatens to commit a criminal offense punishable by imprisonment exceeding four years against a person or a group of persons belonging to a particular race, color, religion, nationality, ethnic origin or other personal property. The criminalization of equality violations from Article 128 CC can be considered as a positive development. Namely, the amendments to the Criminal Code (adopted in 2016) also mention disability as one of the grounds for the violation of equality, which is in compliance with Article 21 of the Constitution of the Republic of Serbia concerning the prohibition of discrimination.

Awareness of persons with disabilities is a very important factor in preventing discrimination in all areas. The results of a study conducted by Filip Mirić in 2019 on the awareness of persons with disabilities about the legal protection mechanisms available to them, show that as many as 70.59% of respondents do not have enough information on criminal protection against discrimination. In addition, the existence of a large percentage of under-informed respondents indicate the need to create active policies to raise awareness about the mechanisms of legal protection of persons with disabilities against discrimination. While the legal framework seems to be complete, it is clear that more needs to be done in terms of awareness raising on the existence and applicability of these laws to protect persons with disabilities and their right to full integration in the Serbian society. The responsibility rests, certainly, on the institutions themselves and the created social policy measures that aim at the social integration and equality of all citizens in Serbia and that can be monitored by the evaluation of established measures and factual indicators of their representation.