Journal article: Theory and practice of aging upon covid-19 pandemic by A. Sidorenko & A. Golubev

Journal article: Theory and practice of aging upon covid-19 pandemic by A. Sidorenko & A. Golubev

Never before in history aging has been such a significant factor for epidemics as it is now for the current COVID-19 pandemic, which features a drastic shift of mortality towards older ages. Our analysis of data on COVID-19-related mortality in Spain, Italy, and Sweden has shown that, in the range of 30 to 90 years of age, each dependency of the logarithm of mortality upon age is linear, and all regression lines are strictly parallel to those related to the total mortality in accordance with the Gompertz law. In all cases, irrespective of the stage and place of epidemic, mortality doubling time in this age range is close to 7,5 years. The rates of being infected with the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus and of being diagnosed due to the symptomatic manifestations of the infection are dependent on age to a far lesser degree. With account for these observations, three messages are put forth:

1) Older persons are the principal victims of both SARSCoV-2 and measures undertaken to control its spread;

2) Older persons are not the principal driving force of SARS-CoV-2 spread;

3) Older persons can and should be engaged in combating the pandemic and its consequences; however, not via selective social distancing and other discriminative measures.

People aged over 65 years constitute a significant part of the current population. They have specific interests and needs, which deserve no less respect than those of any other age group. This includes the right for the quality of life that remains sustained under the emergency conditions. Since the prospects for controlling the SARS-CoV-2 are dubious, those in charge of decisions concerning «people aged above 65» should mind that currently, unlike in the medieval ages, 65+ is the individual future of almost everyone.

Policy Brief: Unleashing transformation through partnerships: The lost potential of SDG 17 by A. Scoppetta & L. Stott

Policy Brief: Unleashing transformation through partnerships: The lost potential of SDG 17 by A. Scoppetta & L. Stott

This Policy Brief analyses how partnership is understood and promoted in European Union regulations and programmes. The central argument of the brief is that a much deeper understanding of partnership than that presented in the Sustainable Development Goal 17 ‘Partnership for the Goals’ is required to meet the transformational ambition of the UN Agenda 2030 in Europe and beyond. Available here

Report: Life and society in the EU candidate countries by Eurofound

Report: Life and society in the EU candidate countries by Eurofound

This report is based on the Eurofound’s European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) and focuses on the five current EU candidate countries – Albania, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Serbia and Turkey, which were included in the 2016 wave of the EQLS. The report reviews three broad areas – quality of life, quality of public services and quality of society – and covers indicators on: subjective well-being, standard of living, aspects of deprivation and the work–life balance; healthcare, long-term care, childcare and other public services; social insecurity, perceptions of social exclusion and societal tensions, trust in people and institutions, participation and community engagement, and involvement in training. Available here

Book: Fiscal Decentralisation, Local Government and Policy Reversals in Southeastern Europe by Will Bartlett et al.

Book: Fiscal Decentralisation, Local Government and Policy Reversals in Southeastern Europe by Will Bartlett, Sanja Kmezić, and Katarina Đulić (eds)

This edited collection provides a comprehensive geographic and chronological overview of the decentralisation processes in the successor states of former Yugoslavia and Albania during their transition and EU integration years, from 1990 until 2016. The contributors enrich the wider literature on fiscal decentralisation in transition countries by exploring several broad questions on democratisation, the political economy of post-communist transition, the role of external actors in policy transfer and the issue of financial stability in the post-crisis period. Details here

Book: Social Policy, Poverty, and Inequality in Central and Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union by Sofiya An et al.

Book: Social Policy, Poverty, and Inequality in Central and Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union by Sofiya An, Tatiana Chubarova, Bob Deacon, Paul Stubbs (eds).

This edited volume maps the developments and trajectories of welfare states in several post-socialist countries and discusses the outcomes of prioritizing economic growth over social welfare. Authors from different disciplines address key aspects of social protection including health care, poverty reduction measures, active labour market policies, pension systems, and child welfare systems across Central, Eastern and South Eastern Europe, and the former Soviet Union. Details here

Book: Extended Working Life Policies by Áine Ní Léime, et al.

Book: Extended Working Life Policies by Áine Ní Léime, Jim Ogg, Martina Rašticová, Debra Street, Clary Krekula, Monika Bédiová and Ignacio Madero-Cabib (eds).

This open access volume addresses the current debate on extended working life policy by considering the influence of gender and health on the experiences of older workers. Bringing together an international team of scholars, it tackles issues as gender, health status and job/ occupational characteristics that structure the capacity and outcomes associated with working longer in various contexts. Details here

Project meeting: POW-Bridge Kick-Off and Methodology Seminar in Vienna

The POW-Bridge Kick-Off and Methodology Seminar brought together partners from six countries & two candidate countries in Vienna on 27 February 2020.

The POW-Bridge Kick-Off and Methodology Seminar was held in Vienna on 27 February 2020. The event brought together partners from six countries: four EU Member States (Austria, Italy, Slovakia, Slovenia) and two candidate countries from the Western Balkans (North Macedonia and Serbia). The project aims to investigate the gap between procedures (legal basis) and practices (experiences) in posting rule enactment as well as how the implementation of the Directive interacts with other EU and national regulations related to posting and how this influences employers’ practices and their deliberations to engage in posting. The project proposes to use novel methods of empirical data collection such as vignettes, therefore the Kick-Off was followed by a methodology seminar, in which the research design and the vignette method were discussed in detail.

Register for the first session of Jour Fixe 2020 on Posting of Workers in Western Balkans

The first session of Jour Fixe 2020: Posting of Workers in Western Balkans by Sonila Danaj

The first session of Jour Fixe 2020: Posting of Workers in Western Balkans by Sonila Danaj

In the first session of the Jour Fixe taking place on 14 January 2020, our colleague Sonila Danaj will discuss findings of the Posting of Workers in Eastern Europe (EEPOW) project. The presentation focuses on the transposition of Posting of Workers Directive in the four candidate countries of the Western Balkans: Albania, Montenegro, North Macedonia and Serbia. The analysis draws from research and a needs assessment of their capacities to implement this Directive in terms of six interdependent institutional domains: legal framework, institutional arrangement, inter-agency cooperation, human resources, stakeholder engagement, and public governance. Register here

Future-Oriented Welfare State Policies in the Western Balkans

Open coordination in education, social protection and social inclusion

The Western Balkans Network The Future of the Welfare State (FWS), utilising the Open Method of Coordination as a tool and the EU Pillar for Social Rights as a relevant policy framework, initiates coordination in education, social protection and social inclusion in the Western. Read more here.

Better Partnerships for achieving the United Nations Agenda 2030

The international workshop SDGs Priorities & Challenges of Social Policy in the Eastern Partnership Countries was held to support the reforms and smooth transitions of the Eastern Partnership (EaP) countries in adapting national policies towards achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Brief resume of the International Workshop SDGs Priorities & Challenges of Social Policy in the Eastern Partnership Countries, 14-15 October 2019.

The international workshop SDGs Priorities & Challenges of Social Policy in the Eastern Partnership Countries was held to support the reforms and smooth transitions of the Eastern Partnership (EaP) countries in adapting national policies towards achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The Eastern Partnership (EaP) countries face significant challenges regarding their social policy systems and strive to transform their social policy systems with the general aim of increasing their efficiency, sustainability and accessibility for all in need. The Workshop was intended to build bridges by identifying and discussing common challenges and proposing meaningful initiatives to help implementing the social pillar of the 2030 Agenda. Read more about the main findings of the Workshop and initiatives of the European Centre here.

The Workshop was organized and conducted by the European Centre in Vienna on 14 & 15 October 2019.